The Collegiate: Music industry responds to nationwide racial injustice protests

Despite the live music industry taking a temporary sabbatical due to the global COVID-19 pandemic, it did not stop many artists from continuing to write and produce. In the face of nationwide protests after the murder of George Floyd, a black man killed by law enforcement in May, Black artists have used their music as creative and emotional outlets to express their thoughts on racial injustice as well as platforms for change and inspiration.

Musical rallying cries for equality have come from the Black community long before the 2020 protests stretching from James Brown’s “Say it Loud- I’m Black and I’m Proud” in the 60’s to N.W.A’s “Fuck Tha Police” in the 80’s which has had a 270% increase in online audio streaming since the protests. However, the newest generation of high profile artists in modern pop, R&B, and rap have lent their voice to The Black Lives Matter movement by dropping singles addressing police brutality, racism, and disillusionment.

Here are some of the key lyrics and newest music amplifying The Black Lives Matter movement.

1. Spillage Village, EARTHGANG, JID featuring Jordan Bryant, Mereba, Hollywood JB – “End of Daze

(courtesy artwork)Brianna Wetherbee | The Collegiate Live

This 6-minute track features Atlanta and Baltimore’s Spillage Village, a supergroup made up of EARTHGANG, JID, Hollywood JB, and JordxnBryant highlighting the apocalyptic nature of 2020 and references the killings of Breonna Taylor and Ahmaud Arbery. The track has an eerie and tense vibe that when paired with angelic vocals from Mereba creates a sense of heavenly dread.

Lyrics – “It’s the end of days, end of times, my o my, up in a blaze, you can’t hide, why o why, all the kids afraid, mama cries, god packed his bags and said bye bye, god packed her bags and said bye bye.”

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This journey in Xyion, to me, is the centerpiece of all to come and what shall remain. Xyion, the the term, “Shari’ah”, must be imagined as a geometric diagram, which will clarify interpretation more fully. Shari’ah consist of the circumference of the circle, which obviously the circumference is that which defines it; there is no circle without a circumference. Once the circumference is dissolved, the circle itself ceases to exists. Thus, for every circle a certain primacy is given to its circumference. Likewise every circle has a center and the center of the circle of Shari’ah is the Haqiqah. It is from which is limited and defined by the circumference that is the Shari’ah. Xyion (for me) equals Shari’ah and this balance is the journey.

Benjamin Crump.

Lolita Files.

Mereba.

Roc Marci.

Dangerboy.

Pregnant Boy.

WXLF.

BRBN.

Incubator

Boogie Shack Media Group

Curated By Media

Delicious Vinyl Island

Goldfinger Creative

OBE

The Movement

The Year Off

Justin Bua

Trusted By

CAA

Empire

Fat Possum

Hyperion Talent

ICM

Kreshendo

Live Nation

Quantasy

Steel Wool Entertainment

Sways Universe

Silverlake Conservatory

UTA

Curated

Apple Home Pod Commercial x Spike Jones x OBE

B.A.G. x Wake Up Show

BMW Commercial x #PoweredByXyion x Get the Connect

Black Marry Commercial x Tate Modern x Alice Smith

RZA x Cut Throat City (Music Supervisor)

DVi x West Adams Block Party 2018

DVi x West Adams Block Party 2017

F. Gary Gray x Men In Black (Music Consultant)

Pregnant Boy x The Garden

Reign Morton x King Sings Event

The Collegiate: Music industry responds to nationwide racial injustice protests

Despite the live music industry taking a temporary sabbatical due to the global COVID-19 pandemic, it did not stop many artists from continuing to write and produce. In the face of nationwide protests after the murder of George Floyd, a black man killed by law enforcement in May, Black artists have used their music as creative and emotional outlets to express their thoughts on racial injustice as well as platforms for change and inspiration.

Musical rallying cries for equality have come from the Black community long before the 2020 protests stretching from James Brown’s “Say it Loud- I’m Black and I’m Proud” in the 60’s to N.W.A’s “Fuck Tha Police” in the 80’s which has had a 270% increase in online audio streaming since the protests. However, the newest generation of high profile artists in modern pop, R&B, and rap have lent their voice to The Black Lives Matter movement by dropping singles addressing police brutality, racism, and disillusionment.

Here are some of the key lyrics and newest music amplifying The Black Lives Matter movement.

1. Spillage Village, EARTHGANG, JID featuring Jordan Bryant, Mereba, Hollywood JB – “End of Daze

(courtesy artwork)Brianna Wetherbee | The Collegiate Live

This 6-minute track features Atlanta and Baltimore’s Spillage Village, a supergroup made up of EARTHGANG, JID, Hollywood JB, and JordxnBryant highlighting the apocalyptic nature of 2020 and references the killings of Breonna Taylor and Ahmaud Arbery. The track has an eerie and tense vibe that when paired with angelic vocals from Mereba creates a sense of heavenly dread.

Lyrics – “It’s the end of days, end of times, my o my, up in a blaze, you can’t hide, why o why, all the kids afraid, mama cries, god packed his bags and said bye bye, god packed her bags and said bye bye.”

View Article >

Management

Benjamin Crump

Lolita Files

Mereba

Roc Marci

Dangerboy

Pregnant Boy

WXLF

BRBN